Writer In Motion: Space Cows 2: Self-edits

I wanted to share a little of my self-editing process as I did it, but I already got started a tad before I remembered to show my work. I thought I’d show you what my notes to myself sometimes look like as I work.

So what am I doing here?

First, I wanted clarity of story, with complete internal and external arcs, and a resolved plot.  I figured I could get the words for that by trimming the on-ship scene, as I feel there’s some repetition (cycling) there to cut out. 

As I did this, I got rid of all my stream-of-consciousness notes to myself (marked in the original by AA…). 

Once I had a decent draft, it’s time to strengthen it by looking at characterizations, polishing arcs, and descriptions.

Finally, line edits, such as weeding out unnecessary words and phrases and strengthening emotion and weaker words for stronger ones. Once it was as good as I could make it, I had the computer voice read it aloud (to increase my own criticism of it), and then ran it through AutoCrit for help seeing potential issues that I was too close to see (including some pesky tense errors!).

Completing arcs took the word count up to 1587, but it feels much more like a story rather than the scene that it was before. Still, it means I had a lot to cut, while maintaining those now finished arcs!

Behold: my self-edited version of Space Cows 2.


“This is where you’ll be going.” The Whale’s fin indicates the Beacon lighting the screen.

You give a show of attention. You aren’t going, after all—you just got back from a mission.

“We’ll need you, Cow.”

Good thing Cow faces are naturally docile. You flick your ears instead of giving voice to your frustration, especially when the Whale continues.

“And a Wolf.”

Your forestomachs clench at the thought of working with a Wolf.

“Investigate the Beacon and come back.” The Whale’s voice follows you out of Command. 

As you head toward the Drop Room, your mind races. The Beacon is some kind of call for help, but from whom, and why? And why is the Whale sending you, instead of a team of Wolves? Wolves are cunning and work well together. Just not so well with others. 

A Wolf joins you in the Drop Room, and you stare at the controls rather than look at him. You breathe deep. You’re ready for anything. 

Or so you think.

Splash! You flounder in the marsh, a bellow escaping your throat. Beside you, the Wolf struggles, the Matt clamped in his jaws. He goes under, then fights to the surface. Your stomach twists. If you lose the Matt, you’ll never get home.

“Climb on my back,” you grumble. 

The Wolf pants harshly as his claws dig into your hide. You try not to flinch. What other tricks might the Wolves play if you act like prey? You don’t want to find out. 

The squishy mud of the marsh sucks at all four hooves as you slog on, the Wolf lying on your back. When you finally meet dry land, the Wolf drops to his own feet and shakes himself. You do likewise as you stand back up on two legs. He holds the Matt, but his eyes are wide and ringed with white. Is he…frightened?

“Come on, we need to find the Beacon,” you say. 

He shivers, eyes never leaving the marsh. Your nostrils flare as you walk uphill, where you can see and smell more. 

“We’re stuck here, you stupid Cow.”

You stop, turning back to him, and wait for the next words to fall from his muzzle, dreading and hating them before they’re even born. 

His ears flatten. “I hung on to it. But the water… Just look! Do you see any lights?” He thrusts the Matt in your face. 

Your hooves stamp on the dirt, reassuring yourself that there is something solid in the universe, safe places in this nightmare. 

“We can’t get back.” The Wolf’s voice is full of bitterness.

“We’ll figure it out. The Beacon is still out there.”

“They’re not going to send anyone after us. We had the only working Matt.”

You shake your head. You slide backwards on the mud, but continue up the hill.

“We’re stuck here!” he shouts, as if you hadn’t understood.

“I’m still going to do my duty. I may be just a stupid Cow, but I’m not afraid of hard work. I’ll figure out a way home on my own if I have to.”

After all, you were given a mission: investigate the Beacon and come back.

And that’s exactly what you intend to do.

Once you’re halfway up the hill, the Wolf appears beside you like a ghost, and you Do. Not. Spook. No, that quick breathing is all exertion. You lumber on to the top. 

The Beacon lights the sky above a settlement, crisp against the ocean, with a tall metal fence rusted by the salt air. The gate creaks open to allow you in. Settlers fill the space, their physiology eerily similar to the monsters from the previous planet. You shiver. You can’t help it, even though the Wolf gives you a toothy grin. 

“The Wolves are here!” The person who opened the gate flaps hairless arms. “And they brought…” He furrows his brow, “…food?”

“Might as well,” the Wolf says. “Since I can’t return to my ship.”

The gate clangs shut, displaying a bared-tooth wolf carved on the inside. Terror slams through you, electrifying all your nerves, but you can’t be prey. Not with that look in the Wolf’s eyes. 

“But the Beacon!” you shout nonsensically. 

“Yes, we lit it as instructed when the water purifier broke. See?” The person leads you to a large rusty machine—a water desalinator.

“We’re supposed to help you.” You stamp, desperate for time. “At least let me try to fix it.” 

“I suppose you can have until evening,” the settlers agree. 

You crouch by the machine. The nearby marsh must be fed by freshwater, so there must be a nearby source. Even if not, there are other ways of getting salt out of water. But you’re trapped inside a fence with people and a Wolf all looking at you like dinner. A wire catches your eye. As dusk settles on the settlement, you realize: the desalinator may never work again, but it could power the Matt, now that the sun has dried it. 

“Time’s up: the people are hungry, and it’ll take a while to cook you,” the Wolf says. 

You finish mashing the new wire with the old to splice it, using the exterior of the Matt to shape it. 

The Wolf’s paw lands on your shoulder. “What are you…”

“Not such a stupid Cow.” You keep the Matt well away from him. “I can go home anytime.”

“Let’s go then!” the Wolf’s eyes gleam. 

“You were going to let them eat me!”

“Come on, Cow, it was just a joke.”

“Fine then. I have a joke of my own.” 

As he opens his mouth, you press the button, Matt’ing up to the ship. 

After your report, the Whale agrees with your assessment, and together you send a message, both to the Wolf on the surface and those on the ship. The Wolf can rejoin his pack… after he turns the Wolf carving into a Cow. 

This version comes in at 990 words, and while there’s still some things nagging at me, I’m much happier with it.

Writer In Motion: Space Cows 2: The First Draft

“This is where you’ll be going,” the Whale says, pointing with his flipper to the screen.

You stare at the screen obediently–AA attentively. It’s not you who’s going, after all. You just got back from a mission.

“We’ll need you, Cow.”

Of course. Good thing Cow faces are naturally docile. You flick your ears instead of giving voice to your frustration or objections, especially when the Whale continues.

“And a Wolf.”

The Wolves had played that awful trick on you, the one that nearly got you eaten–AAtorn apart– by monsters. You’re not looking forward to working with them again, so soon after just getting back to the ship. 

“Don’t give me that look,” the Whale says, eyeing you. 

With a flick of your ears, you lower your head, glancing out of the corner of your eye to the nearest Wolf. They’d shouted and howled when the Whales had decreed they allow other species on their starships, so much so that the Whales had assigned one of themselves to each ship. You were lucky—and hard-working—to get this position, and you weren’t going to let it go without a fight. Even to a Wolf. Especially to a Wolf. 

You turn and get ready to Matt down to the planet. 

“Investigate the Beacon, and come back,” the Whale says, his voice following you out of Command. 

As you hurry, your mind races. The Beacon was likely some kind of call of help, but from who, and why? And why did the Wahle send you, instead of a team of Wolves? Wolves were fast and they were cunning, and they worked incredibly well together. Just not so well with the other species, sometimes. 

You shove the Wolves out of your mind, focusing on your task. Ignoring the Wolf who joins you in the Drop Room you steady yourself, ready for anything that’s to come. 

Or so you thought.

You gasp, a bellow escaping your throat even as you flounder in the marsh. The Wolf isn’t doing much better, struggling with the Matt in his jaws. Your stomach twists as you know the solution, but you don’t like it. Still, it’s better than losing the Matt, and being stuck here forever. 

“Climb on my back,” you grumble. 

There’s no sassy—AA sly— response from the Wolf. Instead, he just splashes over to you and climbs up, his claws digging into your hide. Your skin twitches but you try not to respond, a fear coiling in your gut at what other trick the Wolves might play on you if you act like prey. You think they’ve gotten past that, but how do you know for sure? You don’t want to risk testing it. 

Your hooves are sucked deep in the squishy mud of the marsh, but worry fills you for more than just the ground that doesn’t want to let you escape. The Wolf lays on your back, panting heavily as you slog on, on all fours. Twisting, you catch a glimpse of the Matt, relief uncoiling some of the streets wound in your belly.

“Stop it,” the Wolf growls breathlessly. “The Matt will drop.”

Muttering to yourself you slog on, until finally you meet dry land and can get back up on two legs, as the wolf drops to his own feet, holding on to the Matt. He shakes himself, and you do likewise, watching him with something akin to interest. The Wolf’s eyes are wide and rings with white. If you weren’t sure you were wrong, you might say he was..frightened.

“Come on, we need to find the Beacon,” you remind him gently. 

He nods, eyes never leaving the marsh, and his shivers before turning to follow you. You lead the uncharacteristically quiet Wolf uphill, nostrils flared of the scents that will tell you where to go. As you walk, you wait for the Wolf to help out, to give some direction, but he says nothing. 

You prod him. “This is the way to the Beacon, right?”

Shaking himself again, he looks down at the Matt. Then he looks back at you. Your blood chills. 

“We’re stuck here, you stupid Cow.”

You wait for the next words to fall from his muzzle, dreading them and hating them before they were even born. He looks back at the marsh, his ears flattening. “IF I had let go, the submersion would have destroyed the Matt, or we never would have found it in the murk. So I hung on to it. And look. Do you see any lights?” He thrust the box in your face, and you recoil naturally. 

Shifting your weight, your hooves stamp on the solid ground, as if reassuring yourself that there was something solid in the universe. Reassuring yourself that there were safe places in this nightmare. 

The Wolf continues, his voice filled with bitterness. The Matt’s lights have all gone out, and you know that’s bad, know what he’d going to say, but you wait for him to say it anyway, some part of you denying it, wishing that if he just didn’t say anything, it wouldn’t betrue.

“The Matt’s lost it’s lock. We took it too far out of range. We can’t get back.”

“We’ll figure it out. The Beacon is still out there.”

“They’re not going to send anyone after us. We have the only working Matt. You want to stay here while they repair the one hat ware broken?”

“Well, maybe. How long will that take?” 

“With the materials on board? Years.”

You shake your head and continue one. The Wolf hesitates, clear by the lack of sound following you, and then he runs to catch up, his paws crunching the leaves underfoot. “We’re stuck here!” he shows, as if you hadn’t understood.

“I know. There’s still the Beacon.”

“Don’t you understand?”

“I’m still going to do my duty. I may be just a stupid cow, but I’m not afraid of some hard work. I’m not afraid to finish the task. And I’ll figure out a way home on my own if I have to.”

After all you were given a mission. Investigate the Beacon, and come back.

And that’s exactly what you intend to do.


Coming in at 1,033 words, this did not end up where I thought it would. I had two ideas in my head for the plot for this short, and this ended up taking a third route, though I’m intrigued where we ended up. The worldbuilding keeps developing, which is always fun.

I’m hoping I can edit down some of the internal to add some external, maybe resolve this conflict somehow, but we’ll see. I don’t know what will happen next but I’m curious to discover it.

I struggled writing this, unsure and with no words coming at some points, very different from my first experience with Writer In Motion! But that’s been my writing in a nutshell lately. Words were delayed in coming to mind, and sometimes my fingers had a mind of their own, and wow the typos to fix! But that’s what this is all about, after all: the journey from first draft to final draft!

Writer In Motion, round 2

Writer In Motion is back with a swanky new website and forums and I’m so excited to join in again (without the editor feedback this time, but I’m still overflowing with motivation)!

Check out this prompt:

Image by engin akyurt from Pixabay

I want to continue my Space Cows saga (which I intend to eventually do a reader magnet for) , so that’s constraining my creativity a tad, which is not a bad thing. And then, looking at the prompt, I started thinking, hmm… Current ideas are a beacon, a last stand, fearlessness, and some vague ideas I can’t put words to just yet.

So this week I will post my first draft, along with all the other WIM participants. If you haven’t thought about joining us, you should! I love seeing all the wonderful stories that come from the prompts, and this time there’s a delightful forum for us to mingle in, as well as all the Twitter shenanigans.

Check out the project schedule:

Windward Cover Reveal!

Windward is almost here, and I’m psyched to share it with the world!

What’s it about? It’s a classic fantasy adventure story with a spotlight on the bond between a woman and the dragon she chose over leading an ordinary life. Read on:

When dragons fight, mountains weep.

In nests high in the mountains, dragons and dragonbonded share their lives, thoughts, feelings, and ambitions.

Palon and her partner, the dragon Windward, are renowned among their nest for their flying skill. Their days are filled with everything she loves, especially riding the wind. Even being tasked with teaching their way of life to Tebah, a rebellious newly bonded teenager, can’t bring her down too much.

But when treasures from the dragons’ hoards are found in Palon’s collection, her idyllic life comes crashing down. She battles to prove her innocence, while her every move is cast as further evidence against her. Tebah’s suspicion, homesickness, and defiance would be frustrating even in easy times. With Palon in the spotlight while her rivals smear her name at every turn and stir up plots of revenge, her teenage charge’s behavior proves dangerous.

Dragon tempers shorten, and challenges and disputes shake the ground. Palon will have to trust more than just herself if she hopes to once more own the sky.

Coming September 27th, Windward is available for pre-orders now!

And now… for the moment of truth…

The reveal!

WindwardFC_Text_190905

I love my cover. I love the feeling of movement, and the colors, and the feeling that brings to mind all the classic speculative fiction I devoured as a kid. Dave Brasgalla has been amazing to work with and I’m so fortunate he loved working on my cover so well! It really mimicked the process of editing and polishing the words itself, the constant attention to detail and the way I was able to watch it somehow get better and better with each rendition.

My ARCs are out and in the hands of readers, and I can’t describe the giddy feeling of seeing my work in someone else’s hands! (Pictures have been sent back to me of people holding their ARCs, and I love it!)

 

So: September 27th, Windward goes live! The first several orders of the print book have the option to send me their receipt in exchange for a free Windward cuff bracelet inspired by dragonbonded fashion. The offer lasts until supplies run out.

Enjoy!

Windward is coming!

I’ve been working like crazy putting the last polishes on Windward ahead of its release in early August! Most of my final readers have sent me back their feedback and the rest are coming soon so I can make final polishes. I’m super fortunate to be able to work with David Brasgalla as my cover artist, and he’s been sending me some amazing concept art that I just have to share! I’ve never worked with an artist before, so I’ve been learning so much.

Take a look at this concept art for Palon! I literally could stare at this all day if I didn’t need to finish stuff so you all can read. Dave really captured her attitude here.

Windward_-_Palon_Concepts

I got a draft of the cover too so I could tweak anything that needed tweaking. I love the design of this though- it’s got that classic heroic fantasy feel that manages to encompass the style of the book and how I hope readers feel as they take this journey along with me. Even the dragon nests will be there, in the background on the back cover, and details like the style of WINDWARD on top are spectacular. I can’t wait to see if fleshed out and in color.

Windward_-_Cover_Comps

In the past week, I’ve been working hard designing and fashioning leather cuff bracelets which will be given away with the first several print copies. I almost have the look the way I want it, and I’ll post when I have it just right!

Are you excited? Because this is really happening! I just have to set a date and I can open up to pre-orders. The sky is theirs… but Windward can be yours!

Do you want a chance to read it early? I’d love the reviews, so I’m happy to give out some Advance Reader Copies if you want to spread the word. Simply fill out the form below, and check out Windward’s blurb on my Books page if you haven’t already!

 

 

 

Writer In Motion: Reflection

I’m so glad I was crazy enough to jump into Writer In Motion, even though I wasn’t one of the original participants. I’m so thankful I was welcomed and included, and I feel very fortunate to have found such a tremendous circle of inspiring, amazing writers and editors.

I come away from this experience more confident in my own process, with an appreciation of the diversity of methods by which we writers work our madness. Imposter syndrome is real and I’ll probably always wrestle with it, but now I know I’m not the only one who writes like I do. I’m not the only one who thinks my first drafts suck- even though I would argue with the others that their first drafts certainly were not bad at all! Learning how others handle CP feedback was a treat, as you never know what you don’t know until you find out. And the editor’s feedback! Working with that and watching how small shifts could make such big impact really makes me determined to hire an editor as soon as I can afford one.

It was so cool watching all the stories- including my own- grow and transform in the process of this project, and to watch the Writer In Motion project itself grow as well, with all these amazing ideas we’re throwing at it. It was hard, and I challenged myself, and I think I’m a better writer because of this.

This wild ride may have ended, but I have a bunch of amazing new writer friends that I can’t wait to watch as their writing careers take off!

 

 

Check out the other Writer In Motion participants!

– K. J. Harrowick http://blog.halon-chronicles.com & http://kjharrowick.wordpress.com

– Jen Karner http://www.SyllablesandSass.com

– H.M. Braverman http://hmbraverman.com

– J.M. Jinks www.authorjmjinks.com

– Melissa Bergum (will be posting via KJ’s site)

– Thuy Nguyen http://www.tmnstories.com

– Kristen Howe https://kristenswritingendeavors.wordpress.com/

– Kathryn Hewitt https://spinningmyyarns.wordpress.com/

– Sean Willson https://www.seanwillson.com/blog/

– Paulette Wiles http://www.paulettewiles.com

– Talynn Lynn inkinthebook.blogspot.com

– Ellen Mulholland www.ellenmulholland.com

– Steph Whitaker stephwhitaker80.wixsite.com/swhitakerwrites/

– Sheri MacIntyre https://sherimacintyre.wordpress.com

– Jessica Lewis https://jessicalewis2227.wixsite.com/authorjessicalewis/writer-in-motion

– Susan Burdorf https://writingnotes.home.blog

– Dawn Currie https://dawncurrie.wordpress.com

– Megan Van Dyke http://www.meganrvandyke.com

– Ari Augustine https://bookishvalhalla.com

– Fariha Khayyam http://www.farihakhayyam.com

– M. Dalto https://authormdalto.wordpress.com/blog/

– Sheryl Stein http://www.wrekehavoc.com

– Belinda Grant https://belindagrantwrites.wordpress.com

– Coffee Quills https://coffeequills.com

The amazing editors:

Jeni Chappelle https://www.jenichappelleeditorial.com

Carly Hayward https://booklighteditorial.com

Maria Tureaud https://twitter.com/Maria_Tureaud

Justine Manzano https://www.craftquest.org/

 

Writer In Motion: The Final Draft

It’s been through editing with me. It’s been through CPs. It’s been through an editor. And now, it’s the final draft.

But first, let me show you what it’s gone through since the last time you’ve seen Space Cows.

So I sent it to my editor, Jeni, who sent it back three days later with the following note: “OMG I loved this! I didn’t have much developmentally, and only a little in terms of copy or line editing. Great work! Let me know if you have any questions or concerns.”

Needless to say there was much squee-ing on my part. And then I opened it up. “A little” means 49 changes logged in track changes, in case you were wondering. Here’s what it looked like:

 

Like I did with my CP feedback, I read through it all, nodding to myself, and then let it sit for a bit. Then I got to work. I completely agree with Jeni’s suggestion to switch the tense from past to present, though that left me biting my nails through the rest of the revisions afraid I might have missed a tense change! It does give much more immediacy, though, which is so worth it.

Most of the other comments were fixing commas and rearranging sentences or adding paragraphs for more impact, and I followed almost all of them. Some fixing sparked other changes, to maintain flow.

I did have to stop and think though, as she recommended I deleted the phrase about cannibalizing the ship. I liked how that went along with the cooking of the meat, but it could be too much too. It also is a lot of short phrases in one sentences, which can feel choppy. 

I did it though, because of the choppiness. It didn’t add enough to justify the jumpy rhythm. So here’s my final draft, with never-before-have-I-written-in 2nd person present tense, at 902 words. Enjoy!

You lie among the scraggly brush, your rasping breath loud in your ears. Roars shatter the night, closing in around you. Sandy, barren land stretches between your meager cover and the Drop Site, concealed in the rusting remains of a small ship listing to starboard on a sandbank. Nothing the monsters can understand.

Breaking cover, you lunge for the derelict. The packed sand crumbles beneath your hooves as if plotting with your pursuers to slow you down. You stumble, pattering a staccato beat. The scent of your own fear clogs your flaring nostrils. It’s a wonder the monsters don’t smell it too. 

Or maybe they do. 

They swarm out from the brush, and a strangled squeal rips from your throat. It seems to drive them ever faster, their huge splayed feet grabbing the sand you struggle on, throwing them forward with ease. The primitive creatures never stop, never need to rest, and their eyesight is better than yours. They’d seen you watching them, and they didn’t take kindly to that. 

That moment is frozen in your mind: the flapping hides of the dead creatures they tied around themselves, their swinging limbs, and their eyes gleaming in the dark. Fodder for nightmares, should you be lucky enough to have them later. 

You gallop across the sands and through the tide that tugs at your hooves, as if the water too conspires to drag you down. Do the monsters compel all of nature to do their bidding? You shiver, your hide twitching and jumping. It can’t be. Such a thing would be magic, and everyone knows magic is for children. Just silly superstitions. Believing in magic would be as likely as you hunting and killing some poor creature. Ridiculous.

You fling yourself into the derelict. It has no door to slam in the monsters’ faces. You lunge across the small ship to grab the crate the Wolves had sent down for your return, the crate which holds the Matt and makes this rusting boat the Drop Site. It bangs against your knees as you haul it back to the entryway and push it into place. It’s too small to block the opening, but there’s nothing else, only a few planks peeling away from the interior wall. The ship screams, too loud in your sensitive ears, when you pull the planks away and slot them into place. They rattle and shiver when you shove the crate against them. There’s no way they’ll hold. 

Hoping you’ve at least bought yourself enough time, you open the crate, scanning the instructions. The Wolves set up the Matter Teleportation Device, but they didn’t tell you how to use it.

This was supposed to be an easy mission. Drop down, catalogue the natives, and Matt up. No one was supposed to get hurt. But the Wolves, likely thinking it a prank, didn’t set the Matt up with a verbal or physical passcode. The crate holds a sensor, along with a hoof-friendly lighter, kindling, and two slabs of raw meat. You recoil, even as you read the Wolves’ instructions: the Matt will initiate automatically when the sensor detects cooking meat. 

You stare in horror. Who is this? Surely not another Cow? Could you live with yourself if you cooked another Cow?

Some prank, forcing a vegetarian to cook meat in order to return to the ship. To safety. You curse the Wolves and their set up. 

But whoever this is, they are already dead. You dying too will not bring them back. Bile rises, and tears flow from your eyes and down your sensitive muzzle. But you aren’t ready yet to die. 

Fumbling, you grab the lighter, drop it, and grab it again. Your hooves tremble as you struggle to work the simple tool. 

Something slams against the ship and the planks jump. You lunge to hold them up, muttering prayers under your breath. Of course, there’s nothing in the starry expanse to pray to, but desperation drives out reason.  

You are going to give the Wolves an earful if you see them again.

Finally, a flame lights, just as the barricade slams against your back under the weight of the monsters. Screaming in wordless terror, you scramble with your hooves on the slick flooring, but there’s no good footing. Maybe if you had massive flat feet like the monsters do. The lighter drops from your grasp onto the kindling. 

The kindling catches, lucky for you. 

Hairy arms snake in through the holes in your barricade, scratching at you with blunt nails as the fire flares brighter. Another weight bounces against your back, and roars echo all around the derelict. Fortunately, the metal isn’t rusted all the way through. 

Shallow, quick breaths puffing out of your mouth, you drop the meat on the flames and waft the smoke toward the sensors. Your stomach turns, nausea rising. The things you’re willing to do to survive are horrifying. You are disgusting. 

As the stench of cooking meat fills the cabin, the monsters outside pause, snuffling around the edges of the planks. And then, they throw themselves like a wave at the barricade. At you. 

Your eyes widen and you shriek… 

…and disappear, safely Matted up to the ship. 

The Wolves consider the mission a success. After all, you survived. Even more, in one single exposure to the concept, you taught the humans how to harness fire. 

You taught them to cook their meat. 

 

Check out the other Writer In Motion participants!

– K. J. Harrowick http://blog.halon-chronicles.com & http://kjharrowick.wordpress.com

– Jen Karner http://www.SyllablesandSass.com

– H.M. Braverman http://hmbraverman.com

– J.M. Jinks www.authorjmjinks.com

– Melissa Bergum (will be posting via KJ’s site)

– Thuy Nguyen http://www.tmnstories.com

– Kristen Howe https://kristenswritingendeavors.wordpress.com/

– Kathryn Hewitt https://spinningmyyarns.wordpress.com/

– Sean Willson https://www.seanwillson.com/blog/

– Paulette Wiles http://www.paulettewiles.com

– Talynn Lynn inkinthebook.blogspot.com

– Ellen Mulholland www.ellenmulholland.com

– Steph Whitaker stephwhitaker80.wixsite.com/swhitakerwrites/

– Sheri MacIntyre https://sherimacintyre.wordpress.com

– Jessica Lewis https://jessicalewis2227.wixsite.com/authorjessicalewis/writer-in-motion

– Susan Burdorf https://writingnotes.home.blog

– Dawn Currie https://dawncurrie.wordpress.com

– Megan Van Dyke http://www.meganrvandyke.com

– Ari Augustine https://bookishvalhalla.com

– Fariha Khayyam http://www.farihakhayyam.com

– M. Dalto https://authormdalto.wordpress.com/blog/

– Sheryl Stein http://www.wrekehavoc.com

– Belinda Grant https://belindagrantwrites.wordpress.com

– Coffee Quills https://coffeequills.com

The amazing editors:

Jeni Chappelle https://www.jenichappelleeditorial.com

Carly Hayward https://booklighteditorial.com

Maria Tureaud https://twitter.com/Maria_Tureaud

Justine Manzano https://www.craftquest.org/